Young Adult Fiction

Stand alone stories.

Time slip. Realism. Love and romance. Relationships. Families. Ghost stories. Crime.

It’s tough out there – young people in this category appreciate honesty. The world isn’t black and white any more. The good guy often does something bad. The bad guy rescues the kitten from the raging river. You know the sort of thing. It’s great to write for this age group because you can thread through all the issues and undercurrents, exploring BIG questions and complex plots. Multiple voice novels work well with young teens because by this time they’ve really learnt to listen to each other, and can take on board all those different points of view.

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Ways with Words

Dear Universe,

Please can u make Josh Bradley break up with Megan Clark and fall in love with me instead?  And also make Megan’s hair fall out ‘coz it’s too amazing, and it’s not fair on the rest of us,

Luv

Connie Wood

Xx
 - from Begging Letter

Young adult fiction usually involves gritty edgy things to do with being a teenager. Teenagers can ‘take it like it is’ and there’s really nothing they can’t handle, as long as the writing is in context.


Writerly Ways:

I do a lot of role play to help me get to know my characters. It’s a bit like method acting – only, method writing instead. I write my characters’ diaries, emails and letters, and I go about imagining I’m them. I’ve been locked up in prison, hung out with the homeless, and auditioned to be in a boy band (I didn’t get the job!!!) all in the name of character development.